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Thread: Is this possible?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    88

    Is this possible?

    The ability to slow yourself down carving heelside on steep/hardpack conditions on a normal freeride board with softboots and angles about 15deg. I always build speed up on heelsides. I saw a guy doing it once but with much higher angles. If it is possible I guess I'll keep trying.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Posts
    985
    Should be possible, but the heel-cup overhang at 15 degrees is going to limit how tightly you can carve a turn on heelside to control your speed. That is to say from looking at your avatar I don't think you could put the board as high on edge in a heelside as you have it on toeside without burying the heel cups and lifting the edge out of the snow. In order to solve the geometrical issue you could try a riser.
    "At one point I was seeing my bootfitter so much my wife was begining to think I was having an affair with him."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Methven
    Posts
    493
    I don't think so, unless you get free ride boards from reputable alpine board manufacturers eg coiler donek swoard virus etc...
    I can't point out exactly but I recon flex pattern for average freeride boards is "wrong" for g-force carving. And with 15 degrees rear there will be boot out at the heel cup. I fount it out hard way, tried with never summer Titan and ended up dislocating my left shoulder due to washout.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,652
    Well, if there is space, you could always hold the carve slightly uphill, to controll the speed...
    Or just "slarve" ever so slightly to increase the friction.
    INSTRUCTION | CASI L2 - hard boots all the way! | Vancouver Carvers' Diaries 2013/14 | Items for sale

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Costa Mesa CA
    Posts
    976
    I'm not going to touch this one. Ok... it's possible. 24/9 with flows=no heel cup drag. But I do get a bit of a warble in my heelside especially when the legs are done for the day
    "The older I get, the better I was" Old Guys Rule...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Watkins, CO
    Posts
    993
    Definitely. Skill and setup are the key of course. As stated, you need to minimize boot out. This can be done with board width. risers, binding angles, and properly centering your boot/binding on the board. When setting up bindings, it's important to look at possible angulation, not total overhang. Lay a straight edge against the board edge and the boot to see what angle you will boot out. You'll find both feet are centered differently because the board is narrower at the heel on the front foot and narrower at the toe on the back foot. Check out this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZb1gDrYf0U
    Last edited by Donek; April 7th, 2012 at 11:07 AM.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    41
    what does he mean by "this"?
    Am i missing something?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Pacific Northwest/ Portland Metro Area
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    7,108
    Quote Originally Posted by srodeo View Post
    what does he mean by "this"?
    Am i missing something?
    The ability to slow yourself down carving heelside on steep/hardpack conditions on a normal freeride board with softboots and angles about 15deg.
    Not worded particularly well.
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