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Thread: Which TF liners for low instep?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    Austria
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    Which TF liners for low instep?

    Another boot-related question has arisen, and I hope you can help me:

    My wife uses Blax/Head boots and has just now upgraded to orange Stratos Pros. Since the stock liner provides a less than ideal fit, we molded a Palau overlap liner - I think it's the "Overlap Liner Soft". Molding got good results, and the size is right, BUT:

    These liners lack volume at the instep/beginning of the shin. They just don't really fill up the space between foot and shell.

    The stock liners actually do a better job of that, I'm guessing because of the tongue.

    Can any of you offer an opinion as to which moldable liners would be better suited to solve this? I notice that Palau does offer thermo liners with tongues, but none of them are recommended for alpine snowboarding.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Philly
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    Maybe you can use the liners you have. I have been applying the "boot-fitting foam" that Tognar Toolworks sells to spots where the liner needs more volume, and it works well so far. I think they sell a special pre-cut shape for the instep/shin area. (I think most ski shops have this stuff, so you don't need to go to Tognar; that's just where I saw it).

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Portland.ME.USA
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    My boots are on the big side and the stock liner had lots of heel lift. The 141 took up that extra volume for me.

    http://www.bomberonline.com/store/ac.../hpd_liner.cfm
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    An easy way to take up volume is putting an insole shim under the liner:
    http://www.tognar.com/bontex-insole-shims/

  5. #5
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    If you add foam, avoid impingement on the tendon, circled photo right.
    Bontex shims or the like, single or stacked, are a quick and viable option.
    Or you could cut a foot-shaped section from a plastic roll-up sled.

    Preferably while its owner is otherwise occupied.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #6
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    Austria
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    Thanks for your inputs!
    Now I'll try to hunt down bootfitting foam and/or the 141 liner on this side of the pond!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Colorful Colorado
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    Or instead of a bunch of F-ing around not really knowing what you're doing, make her an appointment with your local boot fitter.

    Also, does she have a foot bed in there? A lot of thermo liners don't come with them and she should really have one in there and (obviously) they take up volume.
    Last edited by GV27; January 18th, 2012 at 06:56 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Austria
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    make her an appointment with your local boot fitter.
    I'm considering that, since bootfitting paraphernalia are hard to come by hereabouts if you aren't a sports shop.

    Also, does she have a foot bed in there?
    Yes, custom ones which already do take up considerable volume, though not enough.

  9. #9
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    ...since bootfitting paraphernalia are hard to come by hereabouts if you aren't a sports shop.
    As mentioned in another thread on the topic, you can use sections of a neoprene mouse pad for fit foam. You could also deconstruct either an unloved stuffed animal (Not a Steiff) or perhaps a sofa cushion.

    These liners lack volume at the instep/beginning of the shin. They just don't really fill up the space between foot and shell.
    The stock liners actually do a better job of that, I'm guessing because of the tongue.
    Maybe excise that tongue from its liner, and install it, in whole or in part, in the new liner? (Dental floss makes decent suture).
    Layers of elastic duct tape, (E.G., Nashua 557) can also work for fine tuning.

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